Valentine’s Day is often looked at as couples-only holiday. But there’s really no better way to celebrate the holiday than with a girls’ day. If you have the time and energy to throw a Leslie-Knope-style version of Galentine’s Day, by all means do so. For those of us on a smaller budget, there are still thrifty ways to celebrate your girlfriends.

 

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At-Home Brunch

Avoid crazy lines and over-priced brunches by opting for an at-home brunch. This also means that you can stay in your favorite PJs. Obviously, it wouldn’t be a good brunch without mimosas. So make Galentine’s Day a little bit more special by sprucing up your average mimosa with a splash of pineapple juice or a candied orange slice as garnish.

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Lots of Sweets

Waffles are an easy treat that everyone loves. Set up a waffle bar with fresh fruit, chocolate, syrup, and of course, plenty of whipped cream. And to make the set-up even more festive, add some decorations with your favorite Parks and Rec quotes. Most of all, no Galentine’s Day brunch would be complete without Ron Swanson’s wisest saying: “There has never been a sadness that can’t be cured by breakfast food.”

 

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Name Tags

If you invite ladies from different parts of your life, they may not know each other. It helps to have name tags ready. Be creative. DIY ribbons, napkin holders, personalized champagne flutes: all can make the perfect name tag for your celebration.

 

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Games

Keep the Galentine’s Day celebration fun with a few party games. See who knows each other the best with a fun quiz about each woman. Your quiz can cover anything from her favorite color to favorite cocktail. Have a small prize, like candy or a dollar store trophy, for the woman who answers the most questions correctly.

 

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Goodie Bags

Finally, Galentine’s Day wouldn’t be complete without a couple of small gifts for strong, independent women. In honor of Leslie Knope, you can gift some of her best breakfast or pro-women quotes on cute stickers or cards.

 

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Text by Katherine Polcari

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